It’s funny because when you think of being sick, you fondly remember the allowance of time to spend in your bed, cuddled under the covers, and having a valid excuse to do nothing. You don’t remember the runny nose, scratchy eyes, swirling nausea, and random aches and pains coursing through your body. Surprise! It’s hard to sleep when you’re sick.

I thought that it would be nice to listen to some music, throw on a movie or some Netflix, or curl up with a book to read that is an interesting mystery thus far, but that wasn’t the case. I wanted nothing to do with anything, but fall into the sweet oblivion of sleep.

Truth be told, I didn’t get much reading done this week because I was down for the count. I was also hyping myself up to get into a more regular writing routine and that completely fell through.

Instead, I’m happy to live blog the Golden Globes, which is my favorite award show because it features both television and film.

The biggest takeaway of the show, which we already knew, is that Amy Poehler and Tina Fey are goddesses. From their monologue to their little moments throughout the show, they were hilarious and spot on. Unfortunately, the show was stacked with awards and ran long due to the fact that all the winners were placed in the back of the theater and it took fifteen minutes for everyone to even get on stage. We didn’t get to see nearly enough of Amy and Tina, who I like to refer to as Tamy, and so I was bummed about that.

As far as the winners, none of the people who I thought- ok who I wanted- to win did, but I also didn’t have a huge investment in who won because none of my favorites were nominated. I didn’t even get a chance to glimpse Chris Evans as I’m pretty sure he wasn’t there.

One thing I did notice as I was laying in bed and listening as I fell asleep, is that I need to do a retraction on my blog! I don’t know how many times I actually mentioned this, but the film called “Still Alice” that Julianne Moore is starring in is NOT the same as the book I just read. Both focus on memory loss, but Moore’s is far more serious about a degenerative disease, not someone falling off a bike and getting amnesia. I didn’t realize this until I cringed when I believed Moore thanked the wrong author. How embarrassing! So, consider this your retraction and my apology for assuming things and not researching deeper. Whoops.

However, I was right about “Wild” being made into a movie. I haven’t seen it yet, so I don’t know how it compares to the book, but I have heard excellent things and I’m glad to see that Reese Witherspoon invited the author, Cheryl Strayed, to the show.

Award shows are funny because we are basically just watching beautiful people do their thing. I mostly just watch because I love opening monologues and seeing my favorite celebrities, though I will admit to getting overly invested and anxious when any of my favorites are nominated because so help me if they don’t win! It’s the same with watching sports games that are uncomfortably close. Almost too thrilling, it’s almost unbearable to watch!

Hopefully this week I can get back into doing some reading and can fill you all in next week!

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Two Books, One Theme, A Hundred Thoughts and What-Ifs

This week, I’ve read two books, a memoir about hiking and a novel about happenstance. Wild by Cheryl Strayed is one of those books that leaves you feeling inspired and in awe of the human condition. I love hiking, surrounded by trees and water, the peace of silence, and the feeling that your body and mind are truly connected. At the end of the day, I also very much like going home, eating a hot meal, using the facilities, and sleeping in my warm bed in my warm house. Camping can be fun for a couple of days, but I’m not sure I would love doing what Strayed did for that long.

Wild is a memoir Strayed wrote about her travels on the Pacific Crest Trail. Though she set out alone, she met people on the way, learned a lot about herself and her strength, and walked a whole lot. In theory, it sounds romantic. When it comes down to it, if I needed to or felt inspired to, my body could handle the physical requirements of such a journey, but emotionally, I’m not certain I would be up for it. To be fair, Strayed went through a lot of emotional obstacles that led her towards the trip, but I am certain there are people who hike for long periods of time because they like to. I am not one of those people, but I do like reading about them.

Unlike the book I mentioned that I stopped reading, I felt connected to the protagonist and her story. It was as much about her personal life and emotions as it was her hiking adventures and there was a nice balance. In memoirs, there’s never the true anxiety of wondering what will happen next because you know the protagonist is well enough in the end to have written the story (in most cases). Yes, there’s still the anticipation of things that you don’t know, but it’s not quite the same as in novels. However, memoirs portray a range of different perspectives and life experiences that can only be shared through media. At times, I felt as though I was on the trail, my legs burning, feet torn up, lugging a huge backpack that contained all of my life’s possessions. When Strayed expressed relief, I felt relieved. When she was scared, I was trembling with her. That is a mark of an excellent memoir, an author who shows not just what happened, but how he/she felt in those moments.

I was sad when the book came to an end and I also had a hankering to go hiking. No worries because Reese Witherspoon hopped onto this book before it even came out and has already filmed the movie version.

When I started The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty, I was excited because I’ve had it on hold from the library since August. I was immediately pulled into the story and anxious about first, what the secret was, then how all of the stories and characters would interact. I cannot give this away, but I will say that the novel is satisfying in that it feels frustrating as hell. I liked the book in the way that I didn’t necessarily love what happened, but it left an impact.

I believe I mentioned a book I once threw across the room because I hated how it ended. This was a different circumstance and not only because I was not about to throw my electronic reader. In that book, it ended without an actual ending, but a copout. In The Husband’s Secret there are great tie-ins and an interesting plot throughout and I loved learning how they all connected. It was very hard to put this book down and I can see why I had to wait so long for it. I finished the book very quickly and felt satisfied with the ending, which again, is not easy for me!

One theme in the book that stands out to me is how the author lingers over the what-ifs in the world. She defines these possibilities, which leaves a larger impact on the way things actually play out. Though it’s important to live in the present in real life, it can sometimes be fun to imagine how things may have played out if you made a different choice, whether it’s big events or small occurrences. In real life, you’ll never know, but Moriarty uses this technique in an intriguing way which only adds to the story.

When reading, I often reflected after wondering what I would do in some of these awful situations the characters have to endure and there is no easy answer. I suppose that what the story and Moriarty wants to convey is that when faced with something, you just do it, which is prevalent in Strayed’s story as well. There’s no anticipating how you might react to something, just as there is no knowing what might happen next. Sometimes, you just have to trust yourself and your instincts to go with the flow. That’s a scary concept.

Though these books were very different, in themes and styles, they both show how important reading is. It makes you think, learn, and view things in a different light.